Kidum – Burundian artist blending rock, zouk and acoustic classics

Jean Pierre Nimbona a.k.a Kidum is the 2012 Kora Winner “African Grammy Award” but is also considered as an East African Music Icon, Peace Ambassador, Burundian Master Drummer, and Songwriter. For a bit more details on his biography, please have a read at the following articles:

http://www.reverbnation.com/artist_2091559/bio

http://www.last.fm/music/Kidum/+wiki

 

Enjoy these two below beautiful songs as well as the ones at the bottom of this page:

http://www.last.fm/music/Kidum

Tanzania – Bongo Flava music artists

Tanzanian music is known for its Bongo Flava style. Do you know what Bongo Flava is about and how it influences this East African country’s musical heritage?

Bongo Flava is best described as Swahili hip-hop fusion.

The word ‘bongo’ means ‘brains’ in Swahili, referring to the need of being street smart in a city like Dar es Salaam in order to survive. ‘Bongo’ became a synonym for Dar es Salaam, but at present it can also refer to the entire country. ‘Flava’ is a Swahilisation of ‘flavour’, thus bongo flava is ‘the flavour of Tanzania’.

Bongo flava has evolved since its beginnings and encompassed many musical styles, such as zouk, reggae, afrobeat and hip-hop. Bongo flava is primarily associated with Tanzanian youth. At present, bongo flava is a genre on its own, it is seen as a different music than hip-hop.

Enjoy the below Tanzinian music artists’ videos and soundtrack:

– Ali Kiba, a candy zouk singer:

– Béatrice Nabisha, a Bongo Zouk singer (click on the link below):

http://www.reverbnation.com/nabisha/song/15492861-kidole-gumba-by-beatrice-nabisha

– Diamond Platinumz, an afrobeat singer:

If you want to listen to more Bongo Flava music tracks, check out this forum discussion:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1423248

Cape Verde: music and dance

Cape Verde, unlike the African continent, has a population with different backgrounds, a different language and culture. Want to know more about it?

The majority of the population is creole (mixed black and white descent). A genetic study revealed that the ancestry of the population in Cape Verde is predominantly European in the male line and West African in the female line; counted together the percentage is 57% African and 43% European (Portuguese origins for the most part).

How does this influence the music and dance you can find on this islands’ archipelago located 570 kilometres (350 miles) off the coast of Western Africa?

Cape Verde music incorporates Portuguese, Caribbean, African, and Brazilian influences.Cape Verde’s quintessential national music is the morna, a melancholy and lyrical song form typically sung in Cape Verdean Creole. The most popular music genre after morna is the coladeira followed by funaná and batuque music.

Dance forms include the soft dance morna, the extreme sensuality of coladeira including the modernized version called Cabo Love (similar to the zouk from Guadeloupe), the Funaná (a sensual mixed Portuguese and African dance), and the Batuque dance.

Want to hear a bit of zouk a and enjoy an energetic Funaná dance?

Check out this awarded zouk artist and a dance routine: